Hoof Beats: Recruiting and pro updates, Frenchy Open set

There’s been a lot of news coming out of Huntsville lately – most of which has centered around a new arena – and lost in the shuffle has been a strong trio of commitments for the upcoming 2019-2020 season:

Daneel Lategan, F, 6-1, 180, 1998, Cape Town, South Africa, Langley Rivermen (BCHL). Yeah, you read that right, UAH received a commitment from a hockey player born in South Africa. Although he played his minor and junior hockey in Canada, this has to be a first for UAH hockey. Cool backstory aside, Lategan is a freakin’ hockey player. He’s a kid who’s gone from playing Midget AA a few years back to playing in Canada’s top junior A circuit (outside of major junior) due to sheer tenacity, mental toughness and a consistent commitment to getting better. That’s no small feat and speaks volumes about his character. So it should come as no surprise that his game exudes those traits that led him to a D-I commitment. Lategan is extremely aggressive and physical, regularly dishing out big hits as the first one in on the forecheck. He’s not afraid to go to the dirty areas and do the little things that help make a team successful. The scouts at Neutral Zone had this to say about him:

All in all, Lategan is solid recruit whose game is trending upward. After scoring just five goals and five assists in 49 games in 2017-2018, he put up a 61/20/20/40 final slash line, which was good for third on the team. Given his history, I’m hopeful he’ll rise to challenge once again and be a lineup regular from day one.

Tanner Hickey, D, 5-10, 175, 1999, Leduc, Alta., Spruce Grove Saints (AJHL). Hickey committed to UAH on the same day as Lategan, making April 11 a marquee day for the 2019-2020 recruiting class. I’m really excited about Hickey. He’s a right-handed shot and comes from a hockey family. His brother played at Boston University and is Buffalo Sabres draft pick (who, coincidentally, was a teammate of former Charger Kurt Gosselin with the AHL’s Rochester Americans this past season), so he knows what it takes to play big time college hockey. Scouts laud him for his heady two-way play, speed/edges, quick shot and strength for his size. “Hicks” can put up points, as evidenced by his 11 goals, 12 assists, and 23 points in just 39 regular-season games for the 2018-2019 season, and is also said to be a leader in the dressing room. Quality pick-up for Coach Corbett and his staff. Should slot in to lineup right away.

Lucas Bahn, D, 5-10, 170, 1999, Hendersonville, Tenn., West Kelowna Warriors (BCHL). The former University of New Hampshire commit recently decided to play his college hockey closer to home when he gave his commitment to UAH in late April. An alum of the Nashville Jr. Predators hockey program, Bahn has played all over the continent these last few years. After playing a couple of years of Midget AAA for the vaunted Skipjacks Hockey Club in Pennsylvania, he played a season in the USHL split between Sioux City and Des Moines, Iowa, and then went out to British Columbia for 2018-2019. Bahn is very athletic with a lot of upside. Moving the puck and generating offense from the back end are his strengths, and you’ll notice him right away for his skating ability. Check out this clip to see what I’m talking about:

As he continues adds weight and gets stronger, his game should grow by leaps and bounds. Expect Bahn to push for playing time early, and put a few extra butts in the seats for UAH home games with friends and family making the short trek down to see him don the blue and white. 

All three were needed for this class. Maybe we’ll hear another name or two added to the Herd in the coming months. — Asher Kitchens

Chargers in the pros: Two Chargers are still playing pro hockey as their teams continue to advance in their league playoffs.

Josh Kestner and the Newfoundland Growlers are in the ECHL’s Eastern Conference finals. Kestner scored in Saturday’s 5-1 win over the Florida Everblades as the Growlers took a 2-0 series lead, giving him four goals and eight points in 13 playoff games this season.

The Western Conference finals of the ECHL features John Teets and the Tulsa Oilers, who are down 1-0 in their series against Toledo.

Matt Salhany and the Adirondack Thunder lost in the first round of the ECHL playoffs to Manchester, scoring two goals in five games. Cam Knight and the Fort Wayne Komets also lost in the first round to Toledo.

In the AHL, Kurt Gosselin had an assist but the Rochester Americans were swept in three games in the first round by the Toronto Marlies.

In other news, forward Madison Dunn signed a pro contract for the 2019-20 season with the Corsairs de Nantes, a Division 1 club in France.

Frenchy Open set: The 2019 UAH Hockey golf tournament fundraiser is set for Saturday, June 22 at the Hampton Cove River Course.

A pre-tournament social outing is Friday, June 21 at TopGolf in Huntsville.

Registration is $150 per individual and $600 per team. Hole and tournament sponsorships are available.

For more information, contact assistant coach Lance West at 907-322-3092 or westl@uah.edu.

The program’s biggest summer fundraiser is named for Jean-Marc Plante,
who died in 2001. Also known as “Frenchy,” the Laval, Quebec, native played for UAH from 1988-92, scoring 16 goals and 19 assists in 94 games.

Future Chargers making strides in season’s first half

It’s been a while since we checked in on our recruits, so at the halfway point of the junior hockey season, here’s where they’re at:

Adrian Danchenko

Adrian Danchenko

Adrian Danchenko, forward, 6’2, 195, 1999, Palm City, Fla., Wilkes-Barre/Scranton (NAHL) – A sure-fire bet for the 2019-2020 incoming class having signed his NLI, Danchenko got off to a scorching start for Wilkes-Barre/Scranton after barely missing the cut in Dubuque (USHL) with three goals, six assists, and nine points in his first six games. He’s cooled somewhat since, but has still put up a solid 26/7/10/17 slash line to date. Scouts laud the Floridian for his great size, good speed, balance, and nose for the net. His stature will certainly be a welcome addition to a UAH squad that’s often quite a bit smaller than the opposition. With legitimate potential still left to be unlocked, the junior hockey vet could develop into a true power forward at the Division I level.

Peyton Francis

Peyton Francis

Peyton Francis, forward, 5’11, 160, 1999, Oakville, Ont., Carleton Place (CCHL) – The long-time Charger commit is having another solid season with Carleton Place in the CCHL. A quick, speedy center with good offensive instincts, Francis continues to put pucks in the back of the net even as the quality of play in the CCHL continues to rise. Plotting 14 goals, nine assists, and 23 points in 35 games, he’ll look to build on his solid first half and help his team maintain its first-place divisional standing. Francis frequently wins races to pucks and beats defenders wide on the rush, so the goals and points should continue to come. I expect him to play at a point-per-game pace down the stretch.

Aidan Flynn, forward, 5’11, 150, 2002, Sping Hill, Tenn., TPH Thunder (U16 AAA) – The youngest Charger commit is a versatile, two-way forward who’s continuing to impress and grow as a hockey player. Scouts love his makeup, hockey sense, and elite acceleration. Neutral Zone had this to say about him recently: “He is very sound in all facets of the game. Always in position, always making the right decision, providing support, chipping in offense, killing penalties. He is a ‘glue’ kind of player and can do it all. Really like his skill level as well as his intelligence and overall demeanor.” With these kinds of rave reviews, he’ll be one to follow in the coming years as he charts his path to Huntsville through junior hockey.

Ryland Mosley

Ryland Mosley

Ryland Mosley, forward, 5’10, 185, 2000, Arnprior, Ont., Carleton Place (CCHL) – A teammate of fellow commits Peyton Francis and Ayo Adeniye, Ryland Mosley’s game remains on an upward trajectory. After scoring over 100 points in 70-plus games in the CCHL2 last year, Mosley had a relatively slow start to the season, but has since been on an absolute tear with 26 points in his last 22 games. He’s cemented himself on Carleton Place’s top line and recently played for Canada East at the World Junior A Challenge in Alberta. If he keeps this up, it’s possible that the skilled, playmaking winger will be called on to come to UAH a year early. Regardless, it’s clear that Mosley has the mind and skating ability to one day be a top-six forward in college.

Joey Baez

Joey Baez

Joey Baez, forward, 5’8, 165, 2000, Tampa, Fla., Lone Star (NAHL) – After starting the season with Johnstown, Baez was traded to Lone Star where he’ll be counted on to contribute offensively for a relatively young NAHL squad. He’s always had above-average speed and puck skills, so I think we’ll begin to see him compile points at a much higher rate than his current 16/4/3/7 totals would suggest. Baez is sure to get more consistent playing time and experience with Lone Star, which bodes well for his anticipated arrival on campus.

Ayo Adeniye, defenseman, 6’4, 190, 1999, Columbus, Ohio, Carleton Place (CCHL) – The sole defenseman currently committed to UAH is really coming into his own in his first year of junior hockey. Maintaining the strong Carleton Place-UAH pipeline, Adeniye is a hulking blueliner with tremendous upside. He’s extremely athletic, moves well for his size, and competes hard. After acclimating to the speed of the junior game, he’s really taken off with eight points in his last 13 games, bringing his year-to-date stats to 37/3/10/13. Most importantly, though, he leads the league in plus/minus for defensemen at a staggering +23, so Adeniye is clearly taking care of his own end and making things happen. With time and top-level coaching, he’s only going to continue to get better. This kid has pro potential on down the line.

David Fessenden

David Fessenden

David Fessenden, goaltender, 6’6, 240, 1998, Parker, Colo., Northeast (NAHL) – A massive tender from Colorado, Fessenden has been plying his trade for the Northeast Generals in the NAHL for the past 3 seasons. The Generals have been one of the weaker teams in the league during that timespan, so Fessenden typically sees a ton of pucks each game. As a result, his present .902 save percentage and 3.45 goals-against average don’t really tell the whole story. Often having to make a number big saves on a nightly basis to keep his squad in it, Fessenden has developed an aggressive style in net. Using his imposing frame, he’s regularly at the top of his crease for shots, which helps him sustain solid rebound control. He’ll have to hone his aggression at the next level, but given his size, strong character, and positioning, he could very well be playing pro hockey at some point in the future.

Outside of Fessenden and Danchenko, it’s difficult to say who will all be a part of the incoming 2019-2020 freshman class. With everyone else having at least one more year of junior eligibility, it’ll depend on how each player develops and the number of new commitments the coaching staff is able to reel in. Losing at least three defensemen and four forwards to graduation suggest that we’ll see several guys commit before long. Stay tuned.

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Hoof Beats: Kestner off to solid start in ECHL

Josh Kestner, who led UAH with a modern Division I-era school-record-tying 24 goals last season, is playing well in his first full pro season with the Newfoundland Growlers of the ECHL.

The season started a little late for Kestner, who was on injured reserve, but he scored two breakaway goals in his second game back in a 3-2 loss to Brampton on Oct. 27. The Huntsville native scored seven goals in his first eight games with the Growlers. Kestner has seven assists to give him 14 points in 15 games.

Kestner signed a tryout contract with the AHL’s Toronto Marlies after his career at UAH ended in March. He was assigned to Newfoundland during the preseason.

Other former Chargers in the ECHL: Matt Salhany scored twice for Adirondack on Oct. 17 against Newfoundland, but spending time on injured reserve has limited his action to five games this season. He recently returned to the lineup and has already produced a goal and an assist.

Tyler Poulsen started the season on the reserve list for Rapid City. He has an assist in nine games since his return.

Also in the North American minor leagues, Cody Dion (2010-11) has three goals and five assists in 10 games for Roanoke of the SPHL.

in the big leagues, the 2018-19 season has been a struggle for Cam Talbot, who is in his coldest spell of his NHL career. The Oilers netminder has a .873 save percentage in his last six starts, all losses, allowing 23 goals. Edmonton has been playing Mikko Koskinen in goal more over Talbot, who has a 3.29 goals against average and .889 save percentage in 15 starts.

Danchenko signs NLI: The Chargers got their first player in the new signing period on Tuesday when Adrian Danchenko signed his National Letter of Intent.

Danchenko, who announced his commitment to UAH on August 25, is a forward with the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Knights of the NAHL. has 13 points (8 goals, 5 assists) in 18 games this season. The Palm City, Fla., native had 12 goals in 55 regular-season games with the Knights season.

The signing period for all Division I and II sports except football and basketball started on November 14, and will go all the way to August 1, 2019.

Sinclair named WCHA goaltender of the week: UAH goaltender Mark Sinclair was named the WCHA Goaltender of the Week on Nov. 19 for his performance in the Chargers’ 3-1 win at Alaska on Nov. 16. Sinclair stopped 44 of 45 shots, the most saves in Division I that week. It was the first collegiate victory for Sinclair.

Club team update: The UAH club hockey team’s first season back since 1985 is in full swing.

The Chargers (2-5-0) began their first season in October with a two-game series against UAB at the Huntsville IcePlex. The Chargers lost 9-3 in the first game, then the Blazers rallied late to win 6-5 in the second game.

UAH played three games at the Scholar Shootout at Vanderbilt from Nov. 9-11, losing 8-1 to Michigan, winning 3-1 to Clemson, and falling 3-2 to Vanderbilt. In the Chargers’ first victory, Alex Reichle stopped 62 of 63 Clemson shots. The Chargers split a two-game series at Middle Tennessee State on Nov. 16-17, winning 5-2 and losing 6-3.

Alexander McLeod has nine goals in UAH’s last five games.

UAH’s next action is Jan. 11-12 at Auburn. The Chargers host Middle Tennessee State at the IcePlex on Feb. 15-16. The Chargers will play more home games starting next season when they join the Southeastern Collegiate Hockey Conference (SECHC).

For more information on the UAH Chargers club hockey team, visit uahclubhockey.com.

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Hoof Beats: Roster breakdown and pro update

The Chargers have announced the 10 newcomers to the program last week, bringing the total roster to 28 players for the 2018-19 season as preseason practice gets under way.

The newcomers feature eight freshmen and two transfers — Jake Theut from Northeastern and Jesper Öhrvall from Rensselaer — to make up for the nine players lost from last season’s team.

The roster consists of 15 forwards, 10 defensemen, and three goaltenders. The classes are somewhat balanced, with eight seniors, four juniors, eight sophomores, and eight freshmen.

The Chargers return 56 percent of points scored from last season. The top returning point scorer is senior defenseman Kurt Gosselin (16 in 2017-18). The top returning goal scorer is sophomore Christian Rajic, who had nine.

Mark Sinclair, a sophomore, is the only returning goaltender that saw action last season, posting a 3.67 goals against and .876 save percentage, but seeing improvement over the seven games he played. Theut played in two games last season for Northeastern last year.

Pro update: Here’s a rundown of where former Chargers will be applying their wares professionally this season.

Cam Talbot (2007-10) is heading into his sixth NHL season and fourth with Edmonton. Talbot is looking to rebound after posting a below-average goals against average (3.02) and save percentage (.908) last season as the Oilers missed the playoffs.

Josh Kestner (2014-18) earned a contract with the AHL’s Toronto Marlies after his tryout in the spring. After tying a UAH modern Division I-era record with 24 goals last season, he scored a goal in three games with the Marlies.

Tyler Poulsen (2015-18) also got a pro contract after a tryout with the ECHL’s Allen Americans. Poulsen scored a goal for the Americans after a netting 26 points in his final season with the Chargers.

Brennan Saulnier (2014-18) spent three games with the Atlanta Gladiators (ECHL) after scoring nine goals in his senior season at UAH. He signed with the Florida Everblades last month.

Matt Salhany (2013-17) switched ECHL teams for this season. After a goal and two assists in 20 games with South Carolina last season, Salhany signed with the Adirondack Thunder.

Carmine Guerriero (2013-17) is continuing his pro career in France, goaltending for HC Brest. Guerriero split time with five teams in the ECHL last season.

Cody Dion (2010-11) switched teams in the SPHL, signing with the Roanoke Rail Yard Dogs on Aug. 22. Dion spent the bulk of three seasons with Peoria, where he scored 12 regular-season goals and two playoff goals last season.

Cody Campbell (2008-11) is starting his seventh season with Les Ducs d’Angers in France. Last season, he started all 44 games, scoring nine goals and 29 assists for 38 points.

Matti Järvinen (2009-10) is entering his second season with Tappara in his native Finland. He had 23 points in 60 games in the regular season last year and three goals in the playoffs, helping Tappara reach the league championship series again.

Clarke Saunders (2010-12) will play his second season in Slovenia, minding the net again for HDD Jesenice. His club won the Slovenian championship last season. He had a 2.16 goals against average in the regular season and 2.12 GAA in the playoffs.

Latest commitments: The Chargers have secured two commitments for the 2019-20 season.

Adrian Danchenko is a 6-foot-1, 185-pound forward from Palm City, Fla. He played for Wilkes-Barre/Scranton of the NAHL the last two seasons, scoring 12 goals in 55 regular-season games last year. He’ll move to the USHL this season, playing for the Dubuque Fighting Saints.

Neutral Zone has Danchenko as a 3.5-star recruit, saying he “has good speed/size combo with vision. Values possession and is tough to defend.”

UAH picked up another 3.5-star goaltender in David Fessenden, who plays for the Northeast Generals of the NAHL. The Parker, Colo., native posted a 3.18 goals against average and .912 save percentage in 35 starts.

Says Neutral Zone: “Huge frame [6-foot-6, 220 pounds] and has consistently improved in the last year. Has faced adversity but has proven resilient. Still a project but has a high ceiling.”

Club team joining SECHC: The new UAH club hockey team will join the South Eastern Collegiate Hockey Conference in the 2019-20 season.

The SECHC is primarily comprised of SEC schools with ACHA Div. III club teams (Arkansas, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, LSU, Ole Miss, Mississippi State, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vanderbilt), but will be expanding by at least four teams next fall. In addition to UAH, the SECHC has announced that Clemson, Florida State, and Middle Tennessee State will also be joining the league.

Vanderbilt, Middle Tennessee State, Auburn, and Ole Miss are on UAH’s 2018-19 schedule.

For more information on UAH’s club team, visit uahclubhockey.com.

Season Recap: 2018-2019 Recruiting Class

With the USHL recently wrapping up its regular season, it’s time to recap the seasons of all the future Chargers. In this piece, we’ll focus on the incoming 2018-19 recruiting class, which recently grew with the commitments of defensemen Dayne Finnson, Bailey Newton, and Simon Chen. All in all, another solid recruiting class for Coach Mike Corbett:

Forwards

Bauer Neudecker, 5’7, 160, 1998, St. Louis Park, MN, Sioux City Musketeers (USHL) – Following a mid-season trade to Sioux City from Dubuque, Neudecker really took off. In 36 games with Sioux City, he put up over a point per game with five goals and 15 assists, improving his point totals to conclude the season with a respectable 60/5/21/26 slash-line on a below-average Sioux City team. All things considered, his numbers really don’t reflect how good of a season he had. Buried on the depth chart in Dubuque and flanked by younger and less experienced players in Sioux City, Neudecker became a legitimate force in the country’s top junior league by season’s end. His speed, hockey IQ, and creativity served him well in his first (and only) full season of junior hockey, and suggest he’ll continue to get better as he gets bigger and stronger. I expect him to step into a top-nine role immediately and be asked to contribute offensively to a team that’ll have lost its top three point getters up front. Arguably the crown jewel of this recruiting class, Neudecker’s signing is major boon for the program – akin to Max McHugh’s four years earlier. He’s a leader who’ll quickly become a fan favorite.

Jack Jeffers

Jack Jeffers, 6’0, 185, 1997, Oakville, Ontario, Markham Royals (OJHL) – Jeffers had a superb final season of junior hockey scoring 23 goals, 56 assists, and 79 points in 54 games played – good for fifth overall in the OJHL. He was a fixture on Markham’s top line all season long and factored heavily in the team’s success. After he suffered an injury during Markham’s second playoff game, the squad was quickly eliminated from contention. A Second Team OJHL All-Star, Jeffers still exhibits many of the same attributes that had him on NHL Central Scouting’s radar in 2016: exceptional speed, lateral quickness, offensive instincts, and playmaking ability. These skills, combined with four years of high-level junior hockey experience, should result in a quick transition to college hockey. Like Neudecker, he’ll be counted on to help fill the void left by departing seniors Josh Kestner, Tyler Poulsen, and Brennan Saulnier.

Tyr Thompson, 6’0, 180, 1998, Sherwood Park, Alberta, Whitecourt Wolverines (AJHL) – The long-time commit will finally be heading south this fall following three successful seasons in the AJHL. In 2017-2018, he had 16 goals, 30 assists, and 46 points in 54 regular-season games to go along with a goal, seven assists, and eight points in 14 playoff games for a strong Whitecourt team.  Tyr, who is originally from Alberta, played youth hockey all across the continent as his father, Rocky, a former NHL tough-guy and current head coach of the AHL’s Chicago Wolves, worked his way up the coaching ladder. The ever-changing hockey melting pot that he grew up in is reflected in his play: He’s a versatile playmaker who does everything well and can contribute up and down the lineup. As the son of a former enforcer and current coach, it should not come as a surprise that he also has a good hockey IQ and an edge to his game when needed. I anticipate Tyr will be a jack-of-all-trades for Coach Corbett, providing a steady presence both on the ice and in the locker room.

Ben Allen, 5’9, 170, 1997, Allen, TX, Melfort Mustangs (SJHL) – The Texan began the season with the vaunted Penticton Vees in the BCHL, but was traded midseason to the Melfort Mustangs, a team in the neighboring SJHL, where he’d get more playing time. The trade paid dividends, as Allen plotted seven goals and seven assists in 16 games down the stretch for Melfort. He’s another guy whose got a high hockey IQ, really understands the game, and can skate. Similar to Tyr Thompson – who was ironically a teammate of Allen’s in minor hockey – his versatility, leadership qualities, and mature approach make him a welcome addition to the 2018-19 Charger squad.

Defensemen

Dayne Finnson, 5’10, 190, 1997, Arborg, Manitoba, Victoria Grizzlies (BCHL) – Make no bones about it, after losing three of his top six defensemen, Coach Corbett had to sign an impact defenseman who could step in and play top-four minutes. Fortunately, he was able to do just that when he secured Dayne Finnson’s commitment back in March. Finnson, a farm boy from rural Manitoba, plotted an impressive 41 points, including five goals and 36 assists, in 56 games played for the Victoria Grizzlies in the BCHL. His point total was first among defensemen on the Grizzlies, and good for sixth overall in the entire league. He continued his strong play on into the postseason, with two goals, five assists, and seven points in 12 playoff games before the Grizzles were eliminated in the second round.  In sum, this past season was Finnson’s second with the Grizzlies, who brought him out west following a 2-year stint of prep hockey with the New England powerhouse Salisbury School in Connecticut. An excellent skater with good vision and a strong first pass, Finnson will remind many Charger fans of outgoing senior Brandon Parker given his stature and ability to jump up into the play from the back end. Don’t let his height fool you, though: Finnson is tough as nails and can dish out absolutely bone-crushing hits like this one back in November of 2016:

 

Drew Lennon, 6’2, 180, 1998, Bloomington, IL, Lone Star Brahmas (NAHL) – Given the Chargers’ aforementioned need for defensemen, it likely came as a huge relief to the coaching staff when Lennon announced his commitment to UAH towards the beginning of the season. As noted when he first committed, Lennon, who is originally from Illinois, has played junior hockey all over North America these past few years. After a year in Connecticut playing for the Connecticut Oilers (EHL), Lennon went to the opposite coast with Prince George in the BCHL in ’16-17, and then to Texas this season. Regardless of where Lennon’s gone, he’s put up solid numbers and continued to improve. Although the two goals, 16 assists, and 18 points he notched for Lone Star in 58 games this year may not jump off the page, they’re pretty good considering the shutdown role he often played for his team. In keeping with the theme of this class, Lennon is also a strong skater who works hard and plays a heady game. As one scout put it, “his value lies behind the red line,” but he still has some serious upside offensively. It’ll be up to Coach Corbett and whoever replaces Matty Thomas as the defensive assistant coach to unlock Lennon’s offensive potential. In any event, expect Lennon to get playing time early and often as a freshman.

Bailey Newton, 5’11, 190, 1998, Halton Hills, Ontario, Oakville Blades (OJHL) – Newton, a physical blueliner who served as Oakville’s captain this past season, recently pledged his commitment to UAH where he’ll be reunited with former Blade Christian Rajic. Widely lauded for his work ethic, leadership qualities, and character, Newton is bona fide defensive defenseman who does a lot of little things on the ice that are necessary for a hockey team to be successful. The former draft pick of the OHL’s Erie Otters shadows other teams’ top players, kills penalties, and stands up for his teammates, as evidenced by the 124 PIMs that he piled up during the regular season. He wasn’t tasked with being an offensive contributor, and his goal, 16 assists, and 17 points in 53 games reflect that. However, Newton could very well develop into more of an offensive threat, as he – like everyone else in this recruiting class – is a good skater with ample hockey smarts. Hockey abilities notwithstanding, this is a kid who’s been team captain just about everywhere he’s played and is revered by both teammates and coaches alike. There’s no reason to think that won’t be the case in college.

Simon Chen, 5’10, 180, 1997, Beijing, China, Cowichan Valley Capitals (BCHL) – This kid has to have the most unique background of any UAH recruit, ever. Born in China, Chen played minor hockey there until his desire to develop his game exceeded his country’s limited hockey resources. Not knowing that New England prep schools typically recruit their players, he enrolled at the Brooks School and ended up being the only “walk-on” to make the team. Later, after playing for a couple of different U18 teams in the Northeast, he headed out to British Columbia to play for the Cowichan Valley Capitals in the BCHL, where he spent the past two seasons. After his first season with Cowichan, he was invited to attend the Vancouver Canucks Development Camp, where he got a chance to compete with a number of top NHL draft picks and prospects, as well as share his unique hockey background with a larger audience.

His 52/2/9/11 line this year belies the improvements he made in his second season of junior hockey. And given the fact that Chen has really only played top-flight hockey for a few years, he’s got a tremendous amount of room to grow as a player. It’ll be fun to watch him get better, and, hopefully, achieve his goal of playing for China in the 2022 Beijing Olympics. For more detailed info on Chen’s background, check out these other pieces done on him:

That all for this year’s incoming recruiting class. Stay tuned for a write-up about UAH commits for 2019-20 and beyond.